Crea sito

Categorized | ENGLISH, Systems

Tags :

Walsh System notes: Forcing Notrump – by Rhoda Walsh (2)

Posted on 14 July 2011

leggi in italiano »

In this article we publish the first two chapters of Annotations by Rhoda Walsh on the 1 Notrump game forcing  response in the “2 over 1 game forcing system” (Walsh System). In Chapter One, Rhoda tells us about the general characteristics of 1 NT response. In Chapter Two Rhoda explains  opener’s rebids in response to forcing notrump.  The Chapter Two  is divided into two sections: II. § 1.The opener has less force than needed to match; II. § 2. The opener has sufficient strength for the game or for a strong call.

Gradually in the coming days Neapolitan Club will publish  the next chapters of the work of Rhoda and a comprehensive table of contents that will enable rapid consultation online.

  

Walsh System Notes: Forcing Notrump

 

Chapter I

General

 

What It Is: Forcing Notrump is a conventional forcing response of 1NT to partner’s first or second seat opening bid of one of a major: 1/1♠-1NT. The Forcing Notrump bid is an essential part of the Two-Over-One bidding system, providing for a variety of systemic sequences.

It is forcing one round only and does not promise a rebid by responder unless Openercreates a further force by reversing or jump shifting:

– 1♠-1NT; 2♣ (or 2, 2, 2♠, 2NT): Responder is permitted to pass with the appropriate hand.

– 1-1NT; 2♠, or 1♠-1NT; 3♣/3/3: forcing.

Note: a Forcing Notrump response to a 1 opening biddeniesfour or more spades, even when responder has a heart fit.

Point Count Requirements. If Responder lacks a three or more card major suit fit with Opener: 6 to 14 HCP. If Responder hasathree or more card major suit fit with Opener: 6 to 12 PSP (playing strength points, aka support points or dummy points. I.e., high card points plus distributional points).

Neapolitan Club Note: Dummy or distributional points and AK support points deal mainly with Dummy’s quality of support and ruffing skill. For example, with three card support by head and a singleton the expectation is to ruff once; without the head, or with a doubleton instead a singleton, no ruff can be hoped.

 Usage: Forcing Notrump is used by Responder for the following purposes:

– To make a non-constructive single raise with three or more trumps ora delayed limit raise with three trumps: 1/1♠-1NT; 2♣/2-2 or 3(♠)

– To describe hands containing 6 to 12 HCP without a fit for Opener’s major, and with insufficient strength to make a game forcing two-over-one bid

– To make a delayed jump to 3NT, showing a balanced 13 to 14 HCP with a two card fit for Opener’s major: 1/1♠-1NT; 2♣-3NT.

When It Is Off: Forcing Notrump is off (i.e., 1NT by Responder is natural and nonforcing) under the following circumstances:

– If Responder is a passed hand (see Part III Chapter IV).

– If there is anyinterference by the opponents: 1/1♠ – Dbl by Opp – 1NT

– If partner’s opening bid is a minor: 1♣/1-1NT

– If the 1NT bid is in response to partner’s overcall: 1 by Opp – 1♠ by Partner – Pass – 1NT.

 

 

 Chapter II

Opener’s rebids in response to forcing notrump

 §1. Opener has less than game forcing values

 

 Holding 5-3-3-2 distribution:

With 12 to 17 HCP. Opener rebids her three card minor at the two level: 1♥-1NT; 2♣/2. Nonforcing. Holding two three card minors: Opener rebids 2♣. Nonforcing.

Note: Opener will rarely have 15 to 17 HCP with a five card heart suit (and 5-3-3-2 distribution), but will often have that range with a five card spade suit.  

With 18 to 19 HCP. Opener raises to 2NT: 1(1♠); 1NT-2NT. Highly invitational. The notrump raise does not promise stoppers in all unbid suits.

Note. Throughout the system, when bidding in notrump, both Opener and Responder add one HCP to their total high card point count for a fine five card suit, i.e., two of the top three honors or AJ10xx or KJ10xx. Thus, if Opener has 17 HCP and a fine five card major, she counts it as 18 HCP and rebids 2NT, not two of her minor. Likewise, if Opener has 19 HCP and a fine five card major, she counts it as 20 HCP and opens 2NT, not 1 or 1♠.

Holding a five card major and a four or more card minor:

With 11 to 17 HCP. Opener rebids her minor at the two level: 1/1♠-1NT; 2♣/2. Nonforcing.

The minor suit rebid shows a three or more card minor. There is an exception: holding four spades, five hearts, and 2-2 in the minors, Opener rebids 2♣ on her doubleton if she lacks the strength to rebid 2NT (18 HCP).

Note. Opener cannot reverse to 2♠. Systemically a reverse here shows five or more spades and six or more hearts. Also see: Part Two, Chapter III, §4: “Opener rebids 2♠ after a 1 opening bid”

With 18 HCP and 5-4-2-2 distribution. Opener rebids 2NT: 1/1♠-1NT; 2NT. Highly invitational.

Holding a five card major and two four card minors. Opener rebids 2: 1/1♠-1NT; 2. Nonforcing. Rationale for the 2♦ rebid rather than a 2♣ rebid: it permits Opener to rebid 3♣ if Responder makes an awkward (for Opener) rebid, such as 2 (after a 1♠ opening bid), or 2NT.

Holding five spades and four or more hearts: Opener rebids 2, regardless of the relative strength of the two suits: 1♠-1NT; 2. Nonforcing.

Holding five hearts and four spades:

With 11 to 17 HCP. Opener rebids her longest minor: 1-1NT; 2♣ or 2. Nonforcing. If 2-2 in the minors, Opener rebids 2♣, regardless of the relative strength of her minor suit holdings.

With 18 HCP. Opener cannot reverse to 2♠. Systemically a reverse here shows five or more spades and six or more hearts.

If 2-2 in the minors, Opener rebids 2NT: 1-1NT; 2NT. Highly invitational.

If 3-1 in the minors, Opener jump shifts to her three card minor: 1-1NT; 3♣ or 3. Game forcing.

Holding a six card major and a four or more card minor:

With 11 to 14 HCP. Opener first rebids her minor, intending to thereafter rebid her major, given the opportunity: 1/1♠-1NT; 2♣/. Nonforcing. Exception: holding a very strong major and a very weak minor, Opener rebids her major first: 1/1♠-1NT; 2/♠. Nonforcing.

With 15 to 17 HCP. Holding a good six card major (i.e., two of the top four honors or better), Opener jump rebids her major to the three level, bypassing her minor (1/1♠-1NT; 3/3♠). Highly game invitational. Nonforcing.

Holding less than a goodsix card major: Opener first rebids her minor: 1/♠-1NT; 2♣ or 2. Nonforcing.

Holding six spades and four hearts:

With 11 to 14 HCP. Opener rebids 2, regardless of the relative strength of the two suits: 1♠-1NT; 2. Nonforcing (but with something like ♠AKQJxx and Jxxx, Opener rebids spades).

With 15 to 17 HCP. Holding a fine six card spade suit (i.e., two of the top three honors or AJ10xxx or KJ10xxx or better): Opener jump rebids 3♠, bypassing her heart suit. Highly game invitational.

Holding less than a fine six card spade suit: Opener rebids 2. Nonforcing.

Holding a six card major and no side four or more card suit:

11 to a 14 HCP. Opener rebids her major at the two level: 1/♠-1NT; 2/2♠. Nonforcing.

15 to 17 HCP. Opener jump rebids her major at the three level: 1/1♠-1NT; 3/♠. Highly game invitational. There is an exception: holding a weak six card major (i.e., Kxxxxx or worse), Opener first rebids a three card minor, intending to rebid her major thereafter. Rationale: Opener’s three level jump rebid tends to show at least a fairly good six card suit inasmuch as Responder may be forced to pass with a singleton.

18+ HCP. Opener jump shifts to a three card minor: 1/1♠-1NT; 3♣/3. Game forcing.

Note. Holding no three card minor, Opener jump shifts to her best two card minor. Opener makes every effort to neverjump shift to a three card major. In general, all jump shifts are suspect as to whether or not they are “real” suits. Thus, Responder must be wary of raising a jump shift suit.

 

 §2. Opener has game forcing or highly game invitational values

Holding a balanced hand (i.e., no side singleton or void):

Holding 5-3-3-2 and 18 to 19 HCP. Opener rebids 2NT: 1/1♠-1NT; 2NT. Highly game invitational. Opener does not game force. Note that holding 19 HCP and a fine five card major, Opener would have opened 2NT.

Holding 5-4-2-2 by a five card major and a four card minor.

With 18 HCP. Opener rebids 2NT: 1/1♠-1NT; 2NT. Highly game invitational.

With 19+ HCP. Opener jump shifts to her minor: 1/1♠-1NT; 3♣ or 3. Game forcing.

Holding five spades and four hearts.

With 18 HCP. Opener rebids 2NT: 1♠-1NT; 2NT. Highly game invitational.

With 19+ HCP. Opener jump shifts to 3, regardless of the relative strength of the two suits: 1♠-1NT; 3. Game forcing.

Holding five hearts and four spades:

With 18 HCP. Opener rebids 2NT: 1-1NT; 2NT. Highly game invitational.

With 19+ HCP. Opener jump shifts to her stronger two card minor: 1-1NT; 3♣ or 3. Game forcing.

 6-3-2-2 distribution.

– Holding 17 to 19 HCP and a solid six card major (i.e., AKQxxx). Opener rebids 3NT: 1/1♠-1NT; 3NT. Nonforcing. Does notpromise stoppers in all unbid suits.

– Lacking the solid major:

With 17 HCP. Opener simply jump rebids her major 1/1♠-1NT; 3/3♠. Game invitational.

With 18+ HCP. Opener jump shifts to a three card minor: 1/1♠-1NT; 3♣ or 3. Game forcing. Having a (6)-(3)-2-2 distribution, i.e., lacking a three card minor, Opener jumps shifts to her stronger two card minor. She does not reverse or jump shift to a three card major.

Holding a distributional hand (i.e., side singleton or void).

Opener reverses, jump shifts, or jump rebids to four of her major.

A reverse. A reverse by Opener is game forcing: 1-1NT; 2♠.

After a major suit opening bid and a 1NT response, the only sequence where a reverse is possible is specifically 1-1NT; 2♠, which systemically shows a 6-5 hand. Since Opener’s hand is highly distributional, only 15+ working HCP are required for the reverse. With fewer high card points, Opener opens 1♠.

 A jump shift. A jump shift by Opener is game forcing: 1 (or 1♠)-1NT; 3♣, 3 (or 3).

The minimum high card point requirements for a jump shift depend on distributional values:

– Slightly distributional hand (i.e., 5-4-3-1): Minimum of 19 HCP.

– Fairly distributional hand (i.e., 5-5, 6-4): Minimum of 17 HCP.

– Highly distributional hand (i.e., 6-5): Minimum of 15 HCP.

Note: Responder is not permitted to pass a jump shift (nor a reverse).

A jump rebid to four of her major: 1/1♠-1NT; 4/4♠. A seven or more card major suit. Approximately 7 ½ to 8 tricks. Nonforcing.

 ***

by Rhoda Walsh (Edited by Paolo Enrico Garrisi)

 

(Visited 2,182 times, 1 visits today)

Comments are closed.

Giorgino Duboin’s column

Italian style 02The Neapolitan Club staff is honoured to welcome a new illustrious contributor: Giorgino Duboin. The great Italian champion will write a series of articles mostly dedicated to his international bridge activities. Duboin’s Column »

Norberto Bocchi’s column

MyWay-logoThe great Italian champion Norberto Bocchi contributes articles on a regular basis to Neapolitan Club. Norberto refers in his column ‘My Way’ to political issues which may arise in the bridge world and sometimes he describes interesting hands. Read Bocchi’s column»   Read Bocchi’s interviews»

Rhoda Walsh Notes

Rhoda_WalshWalsh No Trump Notes by Rhoda Walsh: a study on No Trump openings with their developments  in uncontested and contested auctions. Table of Contents »
Annotations by Rhoda Walsh on the 1 Notrump game forcing  response in the "2 over 1 game forcing system" (Walsh System).Table of Contents»

Simply the Best

Best articles by Paolo Enrico Garrisi: open »

Let’s talk to the Champions!

Best interviews run by Laura Camponeschi: open »

Momorizing at Bridge

Are there techniques to develop some specific memory? Could be possible to make a choice of what might be more useful to memorize? Read what the champions say: open »

Silvio Sbarigia

 

SILVIO SBARIGIA is a pharmacist; he was born in Rome and lives there. He has won the European championship in 1975 with legendary Blue Team, runner up at 1974’s and at Olympic games of 1976.  Sbarigia is member of Neapolitan Club Technical Commettee. His bridge problems aren’t difficult; just we need to think on a plan and to avoid the instinctive playing. Bridge quizzes by Sbarigia »

Laura Cecilia Porro

Laura-Cecilia-Porro 142
Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.